Cover Image Property of PUBLISHER
This image was scanned from the Dianna May Martin personal library collection

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • How to Use This Book
  • Introduction
  • Selected Bibliography
  • Color Key to American Quilts
  • PART 1: Pieced Quilts
    • 1. One Patch
    • 2. Four Patch
    • 3. Nine Patch
    • 4. Squares
    • 5. Blocks
    • 6. Bars
    • 7. Jagged Stripes(zigzags)
    • 8. Diamonds
    • 9. Chains
    • 10. Triangles
    • 11. Flocks of Birds
    • 12. Sawtooth
    • 13. Animal Tracks
    • 14. Circles
    • 15. Hexagons
    • 16. Honeycomb
    • 17. Stars
    • 18. Suns
    • 19. Log Cabins
    • 20. Hourglasses
    • 21. Bow Ties
    • 22. Pinwheels
    • 23. Drunkard's Path
    • 24. Baskets
    • 25. Fans
    • 26. Trees
    • 27. Alphabets and Letters
    • 28. Yo-Yos and Puffs
  • PART 2: Appliqued Quilts
    • 29. Chintz Applique
    • 30. Flowers
    • 31. Flowers in Containers
    • 32. Wreaths
    • 33. Leaves
    • 34. Feathers
    • 35. Buildings
    • 36. Figures
    • 37. Birds
    • 38. Fruit
    • 39. Hawaiian Quilts
    • 40. Crazy Quilts
    • 41. Presentation Quilts
    • 42. Patriotic Quilts
  • PART 3: White Work
    • 43. Stuffed Work
    • 44. Overall Motif
    • 45. Running Motif
    • 46. Single Motif
    • 47. Candlewick Spreads

Title: The Warner Collector's Guide to American Quilts
Author/Designer: Phyllis Haders
Format/Publication Date: TPB:1981
Publisher: The Main Street Press, NY
Language: English
Page Count: 255
Book Dimensions(ht. x w.): 8" x 5 1/2"
ISBN: None

SUMMARY- For a primer in understanding the different types of antique quilts, this is pretty good. She makes cogent arguments for why she sorts various quilts into their allotted categories. She provides a great bibliography of other works on the subject of quilts going back as far as 1915. This book kind of caught me by surprise, as I wasn't expecting the degree of analysis she brought to her subject. My only disappointment was that so much of the book is in black-and-white. I would have liked to have seen the samples she used in all their glorious color.