Cover Image Property of PUBLISHER
This image was scanned from the Dianna May Martin personal library collection

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction by Mary Ellen Hopkins
  • DIAMOND PATCHWORK:
    • Introduction
    • How to Make Square Blocks into Diamond Blocks
    • Using the 30°-60°-90° Triangle
    • Constructing a Diamond
    • Placing a Pattern on a Diamond
    • The Simplest Set
    • Transforming Blocks Into Diamonds
    • Diamonds in Color
  • MAKING DIAMONDS IN FABRIC:
    • Templates
    • Cutting Strategy
    • Piecing the Diamond
    • Tips on Using the Machine
    • Setting in Corners of Cubes / Hexagons
    • Template Patterns
    • Traditional Blocks / Traditional Diamonds
  • CONFIGURATIONS & POSSIBILITIES:
    • Beautiful Block Piles
    • Other Diamond Sets
    • Oddball Sets
  • QUILTING & COLORING:
    • Quilting Diamonds
    • Coloring Diamonds
    • Color Families
    • Blacks, Whites and Neutrals(Grays)
    • Color Intensity
    • Diamond Coloring Strategies
  • APPENDIX:
    • Making Templates Accurately
    • Choosing a Shading Convention
    • Quilt-Maker's Approach to Color

Title: Diamond Patchwork
Author/Designer: Jeffrey Gutcheon
Format/Publication Date: TPB:1982
Publisher: ME Publications, Santa Monica, CA
Language: English
Page Count: 71
Book Dimensions(ht. x w.): 11" x 8 1/2"
ISBN: 0914881078

SUMMARY- This was originally published by Alchemy Press. My current edition is a reprint. I can see why it was reprinted so many times, and why I had found it in so many other designers' bibliographies. This isn't just a book of designs(though there are those provided), it is a book of designing. Watching him transform the standard "Card Trick" square patchwork block into a diamond patchwork block will blow your mind. He goes on to show you a long series of twisted Rubik's cube configurations that are fascinating to see rendered in such away that they appear cut to have sections removed without the aid of 3D glasses. The gallery of quilts using his principles was nearly superfluous. This book should be on every single quilter's reference shelf.